In taking my thought process from where we are now, I felt I needed to look back to better understand how we both got to this point.  I needed to understand what rumblings in our pasts set this tidal wave in motion.
I’m not sure how far back to go but it may be enough to say that I love the
outdoors. Always have.  We weren’t a boating family.  My Mother had an irrational fear of the water but some of my fondest memories are of being near the water.

I started looking through old photos and the majority of them were taken on or at the edge of some sort of body of water – the annual picnics to a local provincial park on one of the Great Lakes

kATHY-AT-pOINT-pELEE

Day trips to the beach

Visits to my Aunt & Uncle’s cottage in Muskoka (accessible only by boat)

Paddling around in their canoe and fishing off the dock

A not so fond memory of extreme sea-sickness on a ferry ride didn’t dampen my love of the water although I remember that day wanting to die. As a teen, I had friends who sailed and had powers boats.

And as an adult with a young family there were always camping trips that involved canoeing

long drives along the coast

clam digging on the Fundy shore and
that long ferry ride to Newfoundland (yes, sea sick again).

from a very early age the kids – even ‘in utero’

learned to love the water

 

Several years ago my passion for sailing was sealed after spending time as crew during sailing races on the east
coast.  I found the rush of the
events thrilling – in those days I was usually the fore-deck monkey –
when I was much younger and a whole lot more agile. The social aspect
was fun too but the real pleasure for me was just being on the water –
whether heading into the wind clinging to the rails at 45˚, water rushing over the gunnels or calmly
cruising downwind – I wanted to be there. I also spent many happy times
sailing with friends in non-racing settings.

I rarely missed the Tall Ships when they were in port

they held the dream that I would never experience

There was also the time
that I had the opportunity to help sail a yacht
from Halifax to Boston
for the biennial Marblehead Race.

 

The biggest adventure though was the
two weeks spent

bare boat sailing in the British Virgin Islands.

Now
that was an voyage to remember!